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  • The person responsible for the design, look & feel of a film and film set.

  • The off-camera events or circumstances during filmmaking.

  • The descriptive, printed line(s) of text that occasionally appear(s) on the screen, usually at the bottom of the frame. (also subtitles)

  • A term referring to the use of 3D computer graphics and technology in film-making to create filmed images, special effects and the illusion of motion.

  • The way a digital video file is compressed. H264 being currently the most widely used.

  • The activity or occupation of writing the text of advertisements or publicity material.

  • A brief shot that momentarily interrupts a continuously-filmed action, by briefly inserting another related action, object, or person.

  • The creative artist responsible for complete artistic control of all phases of a film’s production.

  • The act of putting a new soundtrack on a film or adding a soundtrack after production, to match the action and/or lip movements of already-filmed shots.

  • A person who appears in a movie in a non-specific, non-speaking, unnoticed, or unrecognised character role.

  • The sharpness of an image.

  • Head electrician or supervisory lighting technician in the film crew.

  • A shot taken with a handheld camera or deliberately made to appear unstable, shaky or wobbly.

  • A camera view of an object or character from a considerable distance so that it appears relatively small in the frame.

  • Refers to a conventional camera shot filmed from a medium distance.

  • A small television screen hooked up to the camera and/or recording device that allows crew other then the camera man to check the quality of a scene as it is being shot.

  • The perspective from which the film story is told, and to let the viewer know what the character is seeing.

  • The planning stage in a film’s production after the project is finally greenlighted, and before principal photography or actual shooting commences, involving script treatment and editing/rewriting, scheduling, set design and construction, casting, budgeting and financial planning, and scouting/selection of locations.

  • An early edited (or ‘cut’) version of a film – with all the pieces of the film assembled in continuous, sequential order, but without any fancy editing; also sometimes known as first cut;

  • The outline for a screenplay.

  • The process of filming or photographing any aspect of a motion picture with a camera.

  • Refers to an effect resulting from filming in a camera at faster-than-normal speed (shooting faster than 24 frames per second), and then projecting it at standard speed.

  • An unmoving or immobile camera shot that is stationary, due to the use of a tripod.

  • Refers to previously-shot or recorded footage or film of common elements or scenes.

  • Refers to the printed lines of texts superimposed and displayed at the bottom of the screen frame, often used for translations.

  • The timeline is a window in video editing software that represents all the elements of a composition temporally.

  • A shot in which the camera is pushed horizontally along the ground on a dolly.

  • Is the term used to describe any imagery created, altered, or enhanced for a film or other moving media that cannot be accomplished during live-action shooting.

  • White balance refers to the process of neutralizing the color bias or tint in a digital image by adjusting the color of an intrinsic white in the image.

  • A screen direction rule that camera operators must follow – an imaginary line on one side of the axis of action is made (e.g between two principal actors in a scene), and the camera must not cross over that line – otherwise, there is a distressing visual discontinuity and disorientation.

  • Refers to the ratio of the width vs the height. Your standard TV has a 16:9 aspect ratio.

  • A type of schedule given out periodically during a film’s production to let every department know when they are supposed to arrive and where they are to report.

  • A collective term for all of the actors/performers appearing in a particular film.

  • A person who plans, designs, organises, sequences, and directs dancing, fighting, or other physical actions or movements

  • The process of adjusting colours in movie footage to achieve a certain look & style.

  • Refers to the degree to which a film is self-consistent without errors, jump cuts, or mis-matched shots and details.

  • A French term referring to the design of a film – the arrangement of its shots.

  • The slow fading of one shot into another.

  • Editing refers literally to how shots are put together to make up a film.

  • The last edited version of a film as it will be released.

  • A single image.

  • The optimum time for filming romantic or magical scenes due to ‘warm’ and ‘soft’ lighting conditions, characterized by a golden-orange hue color and softened shadows; occurs for about 30 minutes around the time of sunset and sunrise.

  • An abrupt, disorienting transitional device in the middle of a continuous shot in which the action is noticeably advanced in time and/or cut between two similar scenes.

  • A specialised documentary that focuses on the production of a specific film.

  • The sum total of all the factors or elements placed (by the director) before the camera and within the frame of the film, in order to affect the artistic look and feel of the shot.

  • The tempo at which the storyline of a film unfolds, affected by various elements including action, the length of scenes, camera angles, colour levels, editing, lighting, composition and sound.

  • The final stage in a film’s production after principal photography or shooting, involving picture editing, the addition of sound/visual effects, musical scoring, mixing, dubbing, distribution, etc.; in digital post-production, can also include changing facial expressions, removing flaws or obtrusive objects (microphone, boom, etc.), enhancing the visual image, etc.

  • The general process of putting a film together, including casting, set construction, costuming, rehearsals, and shooting.

  • A measure of the duration or length of a film.

  • The written text of a film, or broadcast.

  • The list distributed and used by a film crew of all the shots to be filmed during the day.

  • A broad, wide-ranging term used by the film industry meaning to create fantastic visual and audio illusions that cannot be accomplished by normal means.

  • A hand-held camera technique using a stabilizing Steadicam that allows the camera operator to take relatively smooth and steady shots, though hand-held, while moving along with the action.

  • A special-effects animation technique where objects, such as solid 3-D puppets, figures, or models are shot one frame at a time and moved or repositioned slightly between each frame, giving the illusion of lifelike motion.

  • One version of a shot. Often different ‘takes’ are shot from each set-up.

  • A method of filming where frames are shot much slower than their normal rate, allowing action to take place between frames, and giving the appearance of the action taking place much faster in the finished product.

  • A transition is an effect applied at the edit point between two video or audio clips.

  • Refers to recorded dialogue, usually narration, that comes from an unseen, off-screen voice, character or narrator.

  • Refers to the completion of film shooting.

  • The first stage or step of editing, in which all the shots are arranged in script order.

  • The position of the camera on a vertical continuum relative to the object being shot.

  • Finding actors which are suitable for a certain role in a film.

  • A shot taken from a close distance in which the scale of the object is magnified, appears relatively large and fills the entire frame to focus attention and emphasise its importance.

  • Refers to the arrangement of different elements within a frame and in a scene.

  • Refers to those involved in the technical production of a film who are not actual performers 

  • Specifically refers to the area, range of distance, or field in which the elements captured in a camera image appear in sharp or acceptable focus.

  • A trolley on which the camera is pulled along the ground.

  • Usually a long shot at the beginning of a scene that is intended to inform the audience with an overview in order to help identify and orient the locale or time for the scene and action that follows.

  • An extreme type of super wide-angle lens with a very short focal point.

  • Refers to the amount of images per second. 24fps, 25fps (PAL), 29.7fps(NTFS)

  • A special-effects process whereby actors work in front of an evenly-lit, monochromatic (usually blue or green) background. The background is then replaced in post- production by chroma-keying, allowing other footage or computer-generated images (CGI) to form the background image.

  • The process of searching suitable locations to film a movie or scene. Often a brief visit of the location in question is needed to assess if the location is actually suitable.

  • A transitional technique that refers to a cut between two unrelated shots (outgoing and incoming) that are deliberately joined, matched, or linked by physical, visual, aural, or metaphorical parallelism or similarities, to establish continuity.

  • Combination of different sounds, dialogue, music, and sound effects from microphones, tape, and other sources onto the film’s master soundtrack during post-production.

  • A movement in which the camera turns to right or left on a horizontal axis.

  • The main idea of a movie, usually explainable in a few sentences.

  • An animation technique in which images of live, motion-picture action footage are traced frame by frame by animators.

  • The camera footage from the shooting, without correction or editing.

  • The environment (an exterior or interior locale) where the action takes place in a film.

  • Refers to the length of time a single frame is exposed.

  • The combination of two actions filmed separately and having them appear side-by- side within a single frame.

  • Refers to a single, static image taken from a film.

  • A graphic organizer that consists of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of pre-visualizing a motion picture, animation, motion graphic or interactive media sequence.

  • A movement by which the camera moves up or down while its support remains fixed.

  • Tracking is the process of indentifying, analyzing and recording the motion of specific elements within a shot. Typically used to stabilise footage.

  • A medium or close-up camera shot of two people (often in dialogue with each other).

  • A film filmed with a 360° camera.

  • A lens with a variable focal length.

  • A film that has a three-dimensional, stereoscopic form or appearance, giving the life-like.